Monthly Archives: November 2015

City Council Preview – November 17, 2015

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Today’s Denton City Council meeting begins with a Work Session at 2pm followed by our Regular Session at 6:30pm – both at City Hall at 215 E. McKinney Street in downtown Denton, Texas. Click here for a full agenda of Tuesday’s meeting with backup material.

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I am traveling on business in Florida and will be absent for the Work Session portion of our meeting. However, recent changes in state law allow me to participate remotely during the Regular Session and I plan to do so. What that means is that I’ll be sitting in a hotel room in Orlando connected to the meeting via Skype. I’ll be staring at an iPad and anyone watching will see a big monitor sitting in my place in the council chambers. It will likely be a little awkward for me and the rest of the council as we work out the uniqueness of chiming in to speak and voting with this new arrangement. But those who were culture consumers in the 90s will certainly appreciate the Max Headroom comparisons on Tuesday night.

Here’s what you will see the council discussing on Tuesday:

LANDFILL MINING
We were set to discuss this a few weeks back, but the item was postponed due to lack of time. I find this entire concept fascinating. Technology now allows us to go back in to portions of our landfill in order to recover recyclable materials that have been preserved, remove them, and make more room for additional solid waste. The Denton Landfill is one of many examples of world-class sustainability initiatives underway at the City of Denton.

Here’s the presentation the council will see on this topic on Tuesday.

GAS INSULATED SUBSTATIONS
During the last council discussion on DME substations, the suggestion was made to pursue a different technology for the city’s substation which would radically transform the visual aesthetics of these electrical necessities. Council indicated their interest in looking into the possibility of such a substation at the site for the new Eagle Substation near UNT and South of Eagle Drive. We’ll be hearing a follow-up report to that request and giving direction on moving forward.

BUC-EE’S IN DENTON?
buceesBy now, you’ve heard the reports of a possible Bucee’s store in Denton on a vacant piece of land of I35 and between the Wind River neighborhood. Though this land is already zoned for this sort of business (after all it fronts one of the busiest highways in the nation), because Buc-ee’s is requesting an economic development incentives, this business’ entrance into Denton will be discussed by the City Council. Two neighborhood meetings have already been held with city council member Joey Hawkins and relevant city staff members to allow the developer the chance to hear the concerns of the neighborhood and adjust accordingly. As I understand it, the owner of Bucee’s is willing to create a significant buffer between the neighborhood and his project as well as preserve a well loved large pond that is adjacent to the neighborhood.

So why consider incentivizing this project? In order for this project to be successful, significant infrastructure improvements must be in place. Chief among them is a Brinker Road connection across the highway into this parcel of land. If you’ve ever tried to access the 35 North access road from Brinker coming from the Loop 288 area, you know how dangerous and busy that intersection is. Discussion of this project has been had with TxDOT and staff from Regional Transportation Council to come up with a plan that would create a solution for this intersection during the Phase I build out of the I35 expansion. That means that Phase I would see significant mobility improvements all along this corridor, including Mayhilll Road, Brinker Road, and the Loop 288/35 intersection. The plan to bring Brinker along in this scenario requires an estimated $2 million local match. It appears that Bucee’s is willing to front that money in addition to funding many other public infrastructure improvements (to the tune of over $6 million) in order to make this project happen. The incentives would be structured to help pay for this investment in public infrastructure.

I look forward to hearing this discussion, but am increasingly impressed with the way this business owner is working with the community to create a project that is good for Denton.

SEVERAL ZONING CASES
There are several zoning cases before the council during our regular session. Please consult our full agenda for the details of each of them to see if you are concerned by any of the proposed projects.

As always, if you have any questions or concerns about the topics on our agenda, feel free to contact me at kevin.roden@cityofdenton.com or 940-206-5239.

Will Denton’s Energy Future be Determined by a Few Fossil Fuel Fundamentalists?

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The Renewable Denton Plan has been six years in the making – the result of a bold step Denton took in 2009 to begin it’s path toward a sustainable energy future when it announced the city would be powered by 40% wind energy. Almost immediately, the city council made clear that we needed to keep moving in that direction. Even since I took office, the direction from council has been to explore ways to scale our renewable portfolio beyond 40% while maintaining affordable rates and excellent reliability.

There are very few cities in our nation anywhere close to 40%, yet within 6 years of that remarkable milestone, Denton announces a plan to increase the amount of renewables in our energy portfolio to 70% by 2019 – and divest ourselves of ownership in a coal-burning power plant in the process.

Think about that. Take away communities who have the benefit of hydro-electric generation, and you can count on two hands the number of cities in the United States who are anywhere near 70% renewables. In fact, the vast majority of cities haven’t even taken a single step in this direction.

This is how you scale to 100% renewables – a goal I fully embrace. You take bold steps when the market presents itself and you do so in a way that maintains low rates for your citizens and commercial customers. This is how you take meaningful steps toward doing our part to combat the cause of climate change. You continually and incrementally increase your investment in clean energy.

But there are some in our community who will tell us that anything less than 100% is unacceptable. I can appreciate the passion and ambition from which such a stand flows. The controversy, it seems, centers on the fact that the Renewable Denton Plan involves the creation of two gas generation plants within our city limits. Despite the fact that the overall emissions of Denton’s energy purchases under the Renewable Denton Plan are drastically reduced from our current position, despite the fact that we are divesting ourselves from ownership in a coal-fired power plant, and despite the fact that we are reducing our overall reliance on fossil fuels from 60% to 30%, the investment in gas generation is seen as unacceptable to some in our city.

Why? How is it that one of the most progressive and sustainable energy plans in the entire nation is finding its harshest critics among our self-professed environmental protectors?

There is a small, yet very loud portion of our population who hold a fundamentalist position against the use of fossil fuels. Those holding this position were emboldened by the historic citizen vote banning hydraulic fracking just a year ago. Even though the organizers of that movement went through great lengths to claim that the issue before the voters was narrowly focused on this specific operational method of extracting natural gas – even publicly claiming on many occasions that they weren’t opposed to drilling or fossil fuels in general – some who voted for this were motivated by an almost religious aversion to fossil fuels in all its forms and uses. And while my study of the election results indicate the vast majority of people who voted for the ban did so to keep industrial fracking operations out of their backyards, out of their neighborhoods, and away from parks and schools, this small band of fossil fuel fundamentalists would have you believe that 70% of our city voters went to the polls motivated by their same fundamentalist positions.

To them, whether it is 40% or 70%, it is never going to be enough. The fact that we are seen as national leaders in sustainable energy, it will never be enough if we are doing it with a plan that includes the creation of additional fossil fuel generation plants. Even though we are reducing our overall carbon footprint, significantly reducing emissions, and increasingly investing in clean energy generation, it is not enough.

I wish those who hold this view could stand with us as Denton takes another historic step in energy sustainability. At the same time, I am not interested in allowing a small minority of our population with such fundamentalist views to dictate the future of Denton’s energy policy and keep Denton from moving forward toward a more sustainable and renewable energy tomorrow.

The vast majority of citizens I talk to want us to continue our push beyond 40%, but in a way that maintains our competitive and affordable rates for everyone. I’m convinced that Denton can and will continue to make bold moves in our path toward 100%. This is why I have called for a council resolution to be adopted, concurrent with the vote on the Renewable Denton Plan, that would make explicit the city’s policy position to move toward 100% renewables when affordable opportunities present themselves.

The following slides show the many different options investigated during the ramp up to this plan and compares them on their overall cost and impact to both residential and commercial ratepayers.

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Denton Can Do Big Things – City Council Preview for November 10, 2015

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Big things are on the horizon for Denton. We’re talking about tackling broadband access and addressing the digital divide. We’re making strides toward addressing homelessness, mental health, and at-risk students as we work with community partners toward big goals. We’re embarking on innovative ideas to build into our economy and reignite entrepreneurship among our citizens. We are working to spark new life into areas of our town that haven’t seen investment in decades.

Today’s city council agenda continues this trend of pursuing big things for Denton. We’ll be discussing our Renewable Denton Plan, an ambitious energy plan designed to scale our already laudable portfolio of 40% renewables to 70% within 5 years. We’ll also be discussing a plan that brings a Convention Center and higher end hotel project to Rayzor Ranch at virtually no financial risk to the Denton taxpayer – a stated goal of the city for the last couple of decades.

We’ll meet at 2pm at City Hall to address these topics. Click here for the agenda with backup material.

I look forward to discussing both of these items with my council colleagues. As always, let me know if you have any questions or concerns. Contact me at kevin.roden@cityofdenton.com or 940-206-5239.